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Seagull nesting on a rooftop, illustration

Data da imagem: 04/12/2018
Cod. da imagem: c0386467
Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

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Data da imagem: 04/12/2018

Cod. da imagem: c0386467

Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

Seagull nesting on a rooftop, illustration. These houses are in the city of Bristol, UK.

Editorial RM
Temnodontosaurus ichthyosaur and prey, illustration

Data da imagem: 04/12/2018
Cod. da imagem: c0386468
Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

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Data da imagem: 04/12/2018

Cod. da imagem: c0386468

Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

Temnodontosaurus ichthyosaur and prey, illustration. This large ichthyosaur (12 metres long) is feeding on a smaller ichthyosaur (Ichthyosaurus communis). Ichthyosaurs were marine reptiles that lived from 248 to 90 million years ago, during the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous. They were carnivorous predators, and being streamlined and swift were extremely well adapted to their marine habitat. They inhabited an ecological niche that was similar to that of the present day porpoises (marine mammals). Temnodontosaurus ichthyosaurs existed around 200 to 175 million years ago in the Early Jurassic. For a black-and-white version of this artwork, see C038/6469.

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Temnodontosaurus ichthyosaur and prey, illustration

Data da imagem: 04/12/2018
Cod. da imagem: c0386469
Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Data da imagem: 04/12/2018

Cod. da imagem: c0386469

Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

Temnodontosaurus ichthyosaur and prey, illustration. This large ichthyosaur (12 metres long) is feeding on a smaller ichthyosaur (Ichthyosaurus communis). Ichthyosaurs were marine reptiles that lived from 248 to 90 million years ago, during the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous. They were carnivorous predators, and being streamlined and swift were extremely well adapted to their marine habitat. They inhabited an ecological niche that was similar to that of the present day porpoises (marine mammals). Temnodontosaurus ichthyosaurs existed around 200 to 175 million years ago in the Early Jurassic. For a colour version of this artwork, see C038/6468.

Editorial RM
Deinonychus dinosaur, illustration

Data da imagem: 04/12/2018
Cod. da imagem: c0386470
Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

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Data da imagem: 04/12/2018

Cod. da imagem: c0386470

Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

Deinonychus dinosaur, illustration. This small raptor reached about 3 metres in length and stood 1.5 metres tall. It was an agile predator that lived between 110 and 100 million years ago, in the Cretaceous period. The large claws, especially the sharp hooked claw of the hind legs, would have been lethal to its prey. Deinonychus had a large brain for its size and may have hunted in packs. Fossils of this dinosaur have been found in western North America.

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Magpie and raptor dinosaur, illustration

Data da imagem: 04/12/2018
Cod. da imagem: c0386471
Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

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Data da imagem: 04/12/2018

Cod. da imagem: c0386471

Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

Magpie and raptor dinosaur, conceptual illustration. The magpie (left) is an example of modern birds, all of which evolved from feathered dinosaurs. The dinosaur shown here is a small raptor-like dinosaur, such as those classified as dromaeosaurs. Such dinosaurs were bipedal and often had feathers. The dinosaur shown here became extinct long before humans and magpies evolved.

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Magpie and dinosaur foot, illustration

Data da imagem: 04/12/2018
Cod. da imagem: c0386472
Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

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Data da imagem: 04/12/2018

Cod. da imagem: c0386472

Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

Magpie and dinosaur foot, conceptual illustration. The magpie is an example of modern birds, all of which evolved from feathered dinosaurs. The dinosaur foot shown here is that of a large theropod (the group that included dinosaurs such as Tyrannosaurus rex). Such dinosaurs were bipedal and had four toes (one backwards pointing), the same as modern birds. Birds are modern examples of extant (still-living) theropods, and have the same basic foot anatomy. The dinosaur shown here became extinct long before humans and modern birds evolved.

Editorial RM
Australopithecus afarensis gathering fruit, illustration

Data da imagem: 10/10/2017
Cod. da imagem: c0374790
Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

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Data da imagem: 10/10/2017

Cod. da imagem: c0374790

Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

Australopithecus afarensis gathering fruit. Illustration of a group of Australopithecus afarensis hominins gathering fruit. A. afarensis is one of several extinct hominin species that form an early part of the human evolutionary tree. It lived between 3.9 and 2.9 million years ago during the Pliocene. It is named for Ethiopia's Afar depression, where the A. afarensis fossil 'Lucy' was found in 1974.

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Homo erectus cooking meat, illustration

Data da imagem: 10/10/2017
Cod. da imagem: c0374791
Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

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Data da imagem: 10/10/2017

Cod. da imagem: c0374791

Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

Homo erectus cooking meat. Illustration of a group of Homo erectus butchering and cooking animal meat, making bamboo spears, and warding off scavengers. Homo erectus lived between 1.9 million years ago and 143,000 years ago, during the Pleistocene epoch. It is one of several extinct hominins in the evolutionary tree that led to modern humans. Fossils of Homo erectus have been found in Africa and in Eurasia in places ranging from Georgia to Armenia, India, China and Indonesia. This scene is based on the 'Peking Man' fossil specimens (700,000 to 530,000 years ago) found in the 1920s in northern China, near Beijing (Peking).

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Neanderthals in Gibraltar, illustration

Data da imagem: 10/10/2017
Cod. da imagem: c0374792
Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

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Data da imagem: 10/10/2017

Cod. da imagem: c0374792

Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

Neanderthals in Gibraltar. Illustration of a group of Neanderthals (Homo neanderthalensis) eating seafood and tending a camp fire by caves in Gibraltar. Neanderthals inhabited Europe and western Asia between 230,000 and 29,000 years ago. They did not use complex tools but had mastery of fire and built shelters. It is thought that they had language and a complex social structure, living in small family groups and hunting for food. It is not known why Neanderthals became extinct, but one theory is that they were outcompeted by modern humans (Homo sapiens).

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Griphopithecus, illustration

Data da imagem: 10/10/2017
Cod. da imagem: c0374793
Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

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Data da imagem: 10/10/2017

Cod. da imagem: c0374793

Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

Griphopithecus. Illustration of a group of Griphopithecus prehistoric apes foraging for food and drinking from a stream. This now-extinct ape was found in what is now Turkey and Central Europe during the Miocene (23 to 5 million years ago).

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Homo erectus fossil skulls, illustration

Data da imagem: 10/10/2017
Cod. da imagem: c0374794
Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

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Data da imagem: 10/10/2017

Cod. da imagem: c0374794

Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

Homo erectus fossil skulls, illustration. Homo erectus lived between 1.9 million years ago and 143,000 years ago, during the Pleistocene epoch. It is one of several extinct hominins in the evolutionary tree that led to modern humans. Fossils of Homo erectus have been found in Africa and in Eurasia in places ranging from Georgia to Armenia, India, China and Indonesia. These fossil skull fragments were found in Bilzingsleben in Germany, a site with fossils dating from around 370,000 years ago. Most of the key fossils were excavated in the 1970s and 1980s.

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Homo erectus fossil skulls, illustration

Data da imagem: 10/10/2017
Cod. da imagem: c0374795
Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

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Data da imagem: 10/10/2017

Cod. da imagem: c0374795

Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

Homo erectus fossil skulls, illustration. Homo erectus lived between 1.9 million years ago and 143,000 years ago, during the Pleistocene epoch. It is one of several extinct hominins in the evolutionary tree that led to modern humans. Fossils of Homo erectus have been found in Africa and in Eurasia in places ranging from Georgia to Armenia, India, China and Indonesia. These fossils are from Australia and Indonesia: Java Man (1890s, upper left), Cohuna (1925, centre right), and Keilor (1940, lower centre).

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Hominid fossil skulls, illustration

Data da imagem: 10/10/2017
Cod. da imagem: c0374796
Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

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Data da imagem: 10/10/2017

Cod. da imagem: c0374796

Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

Hominid fossil skulls. Illustration of three fossil skulls from the human evolutionary tree. At lower centre is a skull of Homo sapiens (modern humans). At top is the 'Lucy' fossil, a specimen of Australopithecus afarensis. At centre is a skull of Homo erectus. A. afarensis lived between 3.9 and 2.9 million years ago during the Pliocene. It is named for Ethiopia's Afar depression, where the 'Lucy' fossil was found in 1974. Homo erectus lived between 1.9 million years ago and 143,000 years ago, during the Pleistocene epoch. Fossils of Homo erectus have been found in Africa and in Eurasia in places ranging from Georgia to Armenia, India, China and Indonesia. Homo sapiens evolved around 400,000 years ago.

Editorial RM
Jehol Biota, illustration

Data da imagem: 10/10/2017
Cod. da imagem: c0374797
Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

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Data da imagem: 10/10/2017

Cod. da imagem: c0374797

Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

Jehol Biota. Illustration of a prehistoric scene, showing the animals and plants that existed in north-eastern China between 133 and 120 million years ago, during the Lower Cretaceous. A volcanic eruption in the background is an example of one of the processes that led to the formation of a fossil record of the animals and plants present in this time and location. The climate was temperate, and the area had numerous lakes and wetlands. Animals shown here include feathered and other dinosaurs, birds, insects, early mammals, fish, flying reptiles (including pterosaurs) and aquatic reptiles.

Editorial RM
Permian fauna, illustration

Data da imagem: 10/10/2017
Cod. da imagem: c0374798
Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

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Data da imagem: 10/10/2017

Cod. da imagem: c0374798

Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

Permian fauna. Illustration of animals in a prehistoric landscape dating from the Late Permian. The specific time period is the Vyatskian, a Russian regional geological stage equivalent to the Wuchiapingian (259 to 254 million years ago). The fauna included amphibians such as Intasuchus and Rhinesuchus (lower frame), and therapsids such as Cistecephalus and Gorgonops and Inostrancevia (upper frame).

Editorial RM
Confuciusornis bird skeleton, illustration

Data da imagem: 10/10/2017
Cod. da imagem: c0374799
Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

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Data da imagem: 10/10/2017

Cod. da imagem: c0374799

Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

Confuciusornis bird skeleton, illustration. Confuciusornis sanctus is an extinct bird that was common in the Cretaceous (146 to 65 million years ago). It was seen by riversides in what would later become Asia. This bird had 'finger claws' on its wings, and used these to climb on the bark of trees. It fed on nuts and seeds with its toothless beak.

Editorial RM
Confuciusornis prehistoric birds, illustration

Data da imagem: 10/10/2017
Cod. da imagem: c0374800
Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Data da imagem: 10/10/2017

Cod. da imagem: c0374800

Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

Confuciusornis prehistoric birds, illustration. Confuciusornis sanctus is an extinct bird that was common in the Cretaceous (146 to 65 million years ago). It was seen by riversides in what would later become Asia. This bird had 'finger claws' on its wings, and used these to climb on the bark of trees. It fed on nuts and seeds with its toothless beak. Males (one at left) had twin tail feathers.

Editorial RM
Dromaeosaur, illustration

Data da imagem: 10/10/2017
Cod. da imagem: c0374801
Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

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Data da imagem: 10/10/2017

Cod. da imagem: c0374801

Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

Dromaeosaur, illustration. Illustration of the feathered dinosaur Dromaeosaur. This carnivorous dinosaur was about 2 to 6 metres in length, It had powerful claws and modified forelimbs. It lived in the Late Cretaceous, about 80 to 65 million years ago.

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Dimorphodon skeleton, illustration

Data da imagem: 10/10/2017
Cod. da imagem: c0374802
Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

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Data da imagem: 10/10/2017

Cod. da imagem: c0374802

Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

Dimorphodon skeleton, illustration. This profile view shows the quadrapedal posture this flying reptile could adopt. Dimorphodon was a pterosaur that lived during the Early Jurassic Period (around 200 to 175 million years ago) in what is now southern England. It had a wingspan of around 1.45 metres.

Editorial RM
Estemmenosuchus therapsid, illustration

Data da imagem: 10/10/2017
Cod. da imagem: c0374803
Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

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Data da imagem: 10/10/2017

Cod. da imagem: c0374803

Crédito: John Sibbick / Science Photo Library/ Science Photo Library/ Fotoarena

Estemmenosuchus therapsid, illustration. Estemmenosuchus existed around 267 million years ago, during the Middle Permian. It was an omnivorous animal, with distinctive horn-like structures. Therapsids included the animals that later evolved into mammals.

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