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Clandestine ditches in the turkey cemetery

Data da imagem: 08/03/2018
Cod. da imagem: 1619448
Crédito: Juca Rodrigues/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Data da imagem: 08/03/2018

Cod. da imagem: 1619448

Crédito: Juca Rodrigues/ Fotoarena

The Don Bosco Cemetery, better known as the Turret Cemetery, now called Martyr Hill, was the place where hundreds of prisoners were buried underground by the military dictatorship's clandestine burial ground in the early 1970s politicians tortured and murdered in prisons in São Paulo. In 1990, there were found in a common ditch 1,049 black plastic bags containing remains of indigents, part of them were bodies of those opponents of the regime hitherto reported as missing. The mayor of São Paulo at the time, Luiza Erundina, ordered the removal of these bodies from the cemetery and sent them to the University of Campinas (Unicamp). Today, experts believe there may be more bodies of people killed by the dictatorship buried there.

Editorial RM
Clandestine ditches in the turkey cemetery

Data da imagem: 08/03/2018
Cod. da imagem: 1619447
Crédito: Juca Rodrigues/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Data da imagem: 08/03/2018

Cod. da imagem: 1619447

Crédito: Juca Rodrigues/ Fotoarena

The Don Bosco Cemetery, better known as the Turret Cemetery, now called Martyr Hill, was the place where hundreds of prisoners were buried underground by the military dictatorship's clandestine burial ground in the early 1970s politicians tortured and murdered in prisons in São Paulo. In 1990, there were found in a common ditch 1,049 black plastic bags containing remains of indigents, part of them were bodies of those opponents of the regime hitherto reported as missing. The mayor of São Paulo at the time, Luiza Erundina, ordered the removal of these bodies from the cemetery and sent them to the University of Campinas (Unicamp). Today, experts believe there may be more bodies of people killed by the dictatorship buried there.

Editorial RM
Clandestine ditches in the turkey cemetery

Data da imagem: 08/03/2018
Cod. da imagem: 1619446
Crédito: Juca Rodrigues/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Data da imagem: 08/03/2018

Cod. da imagem: 1619446

Crédito: Juca Rodrigues/ Fotoarena

The Don Bosco Cemetery, better known as the Turret Cemetery, now called Martyr Hill, was the place where hundreds of prisoners were buried underground by the military dictatorship's clandestine burial ground in the early 1970s politicians tortured and murdered in prisons in São Paulo. In 1990, there were found in a common ditch 1,049 black plastic bags containing remains of indigents, part of them were bodies of those opponents of the regime hitherto reported as missing. The mayor of São Paulo at the time, Luiza Erundina, ordered the removal of these bodies from the cemetery and sent them to the University of Campinas (Unicamp). Today, experts believe there may be more bodies of people killed by the dictatorship buried there.

Editorial RM
Clandestine ditches in the turkey cemetery

Data da imagem: 08/03/2018
Cod. da imagem: 1619445
Crédito: Juca Rodrigues/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Data da imagem: 08/03/2018

Cod. da imagem: 1619445

Crédito: Juca Rodrigues/ Fotoarena

The Don Bosco Cemetery, better known as the Turret Cemetery, now called Martyr Hill, was the place where hundreds of prisoners were buried underground by the military dictatorship's clandestine burial ground in the early 1970s politicians tortured and murdered in prisons in São Paulo. In 1990, there were found in a common ditch 1,049 black plastic bags containing remains of indigents, part of them were bodies of those opponents of the regime hitherto reported as missing. The mayor of São Paulo at the time, Luiza Erundina, ordered the removal of these bodies from the cemetery and sent them to the University of Campinas (Unicamp). Today, experts believe there may be more bodies of people killed by the dictatorship buried there.

Editorial RM
Clandestine ditches in the turkey cemetery

Data da imagem: 08/03/2018
Cod. da imagem: 1619451
Crédito: Juca Rodrigues/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Data da imagem: 08/03/2018

Cod. da imagem: 1619451

Crédito: Juca Rodrigues/ Fotoarena

The Don Bosco Cemetery, better known as the Turret Cemetery, now called Martyr Hill, was the place where hundreds of prisoners were buried underground by the military dictatorship's clandestine burial ground in the early 1970s politicians tortured and murdered in prisons in São Paulo. In 1990, there were found in a common ditch 1,049 black plastic bags containing remains of indigents, part of them were bodies of those opponents of the regime hitherto reported as missing. The mayor of São Paulo at the time, Luiza Erundina, ordered the removal of these bodies from the cemetery and sent them to the University of Campinas (Unicamp). Today, experts believe there may be more bodies of people killed by the dictatorship buried there. A wall and a small brick structure (photo) mark the exact location where the 1,049 plastic bags containing these remains were found.

Editorial RM
Clandestine ditches in the turkey cemetery

Data da imagem: 08/03/2018
Cod. da imagem: 1619444
Crédito: Juca Rodrigues/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Data da imagem: 08/03/2018

Cod. da imagem: 1619444

Crédito: Juca Rodrigues/ Fotoarena

The Don Bosco Cemetery, better known as the Turret Cemetery, now called Martyr Hill, was the place where hundreds of prisoners were buried underground by the military dictatorship's clandestine burial ground in the early 1970s politicians tortured and murdered in prisons in São Paulo. In 1990, there were found in a common ditch 1,049 black plastic bags containing remains of indigents, part of them were bodies of those opponents of the regime hitherto reported as missing. The mayor of São Paulo at the time, Luiza Erundina, ordered the removal of these bodies from the cemetery and sent them to the University of Campinas (Unicamp). Today, experts believe there may be more bodies of people killed by the dictatorship buried there.

Editorial RM
Clandestine ditches in the turkey cemetery

Data da imagem: 08/03/2018
Cod. da imagem: 1619450
Crédito: Juca Rodrigues/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Data da imagem: 08/03/2018

Cod. da imagem: 1619450

Crédito: Juca Rodrigues/ Fotoarena

The Don Bosco Cemetery, better known as the Turret Cemetery, now called Martyr Hill, was the place where hundreds of prisoners were buried underground by the military dictatorship's clandestine burial ground in the early 1970s politicians tortured and murdered in prisons in São Paulo. In 1990, there were found in a common ditch 1,049 black plastic bags containing remains of indigents, part of them were bodies of those opponents of the regime hitherto reported as missing. The mayor of São Paulo at the time, Luiza Erundina, ordered the removal of these bodies from the cemetery and sent them to the University of Campinas (Unicamp). Today, experts believe there may be more bodies of people killed by the dictatorship buried there. A wall and a small brick structure (photo) mark the exact location where the 1,049 plastic bags containing these remains were found.

Editorial RM
Clandestine ditches in the turkey cemetery

Data da imagem: 08/03/2018
Cod. da imagem: 1619443
Crédito: Juca Rodrigues/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Data da imagem: 08/03/2018

Cod. da imagem: 1619443

Crédito: Juca Rodrigues/ Fotoarena

The Don Bosco Cemetery, better known as the Turret Cemetery, now called Martyr Hill, was the place where hundreds of prisoners were buried underground by the military dictatorship's clandestine burial ground in the early 1970s politicians tortured and murdered in prisons in São Paulo. In 1990, there were found in a common ditch 1,049 black plastic bags containing remains of indigents, part of them were bodies of those opponents of the regime hitherto reported as missing. The mayor of São Paulo at the time, Luiza Erundina, ordered the removal of these bodies from the cemetery and sent them to the University of Campinas (Unicamp). Today, experts believe there may be more bodies of people killed by the dictatorship buried there. In a concrete frame (photo) is a metal plaque, placed in 2017 by the Commission of Memory and Truth of the City of São Paulo, in memory of these disappeared politicians.

Editorial RM
Clandestine ditches in the turkey cemetery

Data da imagem: 08/03/2018
Cod. da imagem: 1619449
Crédito: Juca Rodrigues/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Data da imagem: 08/03/2018

Cod. da imagem: 1619449

Crédito: Juca Rodrigues/ Fotoarena

The Don Bosco Cemetery, better known as the Turret Cemetery, now called Martyr Hill, was the place where hundreds of prisoners were buried underground by the military dictatorship's clandestine burial ground in the early 1970s politicians tortured and murdered in prisons in São Paulo. In 1990, there were found in a common ditch 1,049 black plastic bags containing remains of indigents, part of them were bodies of those opponents of the regime hitherto reported as missing. The mayor of São Paulo at the time, Luiza Erundina, ordered the removal of these bodies from the cemetery and sent them to the University of Campinas (Unicamp). Today, experts believe there may be more bodies of people killed by the dictatorship buried there. In a concrete frame (photo) is a metal plaque, placed in 2017 by the Commission of Memory and Truth of the City of São Paulo, in memory of these disappeared politicians.

Editorial RM
Clandestine ditches in the turkey cemetery

Data da imagem: 01/03/2018
Cod. da imagem: 1619442
Crédito: Juca Rodrigues/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Data da imagem: 01/03/2018

Cod. da imagem: 1619442

Crédito: Juca Rodrigues/ Fotoarena

The Don Bosco Cemetery, better known as the Turret Cemetery, now called Martyr Hill, was the place where hundreds of prisoners were buried underground by the military dictatorship's clandestine burial ground in the early 1970s politicians tortured and murdered in prisons in São Paulo. In 1990, there were found in a common ditch 1,049 black plastic bags containing remains of indigents, part of them were bodies of those opponents of the regime hitherto reported as missing. The mayor of São Paulo at the time, Luiza Erundina, ordered the removal of these bodies from the cemetery and sent them to the University of Campinas (Unicamp). Today, experts believe there may be more bodies of people killed by the dictatorship buried there. In a concrete frame (photo) is a metal plaque, placed in 2017 by the Commission of Memory and Truth of the City of São Paulo, in memory of these disappeared politicians.

Editorial RM
 
 
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